SNK Features Debut Trailer for The King of Fighters XV, Samurai Shodown Season 3, and more!

SNK has finally unveiled their debut trailer for The King of Fighters XV! In a recent presentation, SNK featured their newest game featuring several KOF favorites to include Kyo, Mai, and Leona. Additionally, they’ve showcased the latest Season Pass DLC for Samurai Shodown as well as included a few extra goodies: The King of Fighters XIV Ultimate Edition and The King of Fighters 2002 UM featuring rollback netcode for PS4!

I’m honestly quite stoked for KOF XV. This largely stems from how much I love using Terry in Smash Bros. and dove into the SNK rabbit hole thanks to his inclusion. I got KOF XIV only to run into a barren wasteland online which, in turn, is thanks to its lukewarm reception and poor netcode. I’ve been wanting to get into KOF for a good while now and I’m really hoping SNK will deliver with XV.

Samurai Shodown

Believe it or not, SNK introduced not one, but two, characters for Season Pass 3! The first is Cham-Cham, the cute feral girl from past SamSho titles. The second? None other than Hibiki from The Last Blade.

What I love about this is seeing The Last Blade get some love. Hibiki might be known to some fighting gamers as a character from Capcom vs. SNK 2. But The Last Blade is rarely heard of in conversation. It’s a weapons-based 2D fighting game taking place during the end of the Edo period. Anime and manga fans who might be familiar with this timeframe might associate this with Rurouni Kenshin. In fact, The Last Blade does feature several influences from the famous samurai manga series.

I only became a fan of the Last Blade titles last year when CodeMystics released them on PS4 and PC. Despite being relics from the 90s, they play amazingly well. It’s the kind of game I would love to play in tournaments. I’ve always been a fan of weapons-based fighting games like SoulCalibur. I definitely love the game’s aesthetic and music too. But as SNK likely won’t revive the series anytime soon, I’m more than happy seeing The Last Blade representation in SamSho. Perhaps this will open the gateway for more Last Blade characters to enter SamSho as well.

Truth be told, I wish I could be more hype about this. In fact, I would love to play more Samurai Shodown. Unfortunately, due to the once again terrible netcode, the game was left in a barren state online. In the worst possible time period to have bad netcode in fighting games, SNK will not add rollback and, thus, leaves Samurai Shodown on PS4 to its barren fate.

The King of Fighters XIV Ultimate Edition

Remember what I said about KOF XIV? I practically rushed to go buy it on PS4 once it went on sale and I was riding that SNK high in Smash Bros. After a few trips through Arcade mode and several unsuccessful attempts to play online, that was it.

Sadly, KOF XIV will not introduce rollback netcode to this re-release. This sucks because CodeMystics, who released several of SNK’s classic 90s and 2000s titles on consoles and PC, implemented rollback into these games. KOF XIV, SNK’s last prominent entry in the series, will just have the same delay-based netcode. As such, I don’t expect people to play it online. I’ll just have to wait for KOF XV to come out.

The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match

On the flipside, the game that introduced me to the KOF series is getting a re-release on PS4 and will feature rollback netcode. This alone gets me hype because, after Capcom vs. SNK 2, I bought this game on my 360 around 10 years ago. I loved KOF 2002 UM’s music so much! This was the game for me!

However, like with the PS4 releases of Garou, The Last Blade, and KOF ’97, I am a little worried that online will be barren again. Not because of netcode but because it’s the re-release of an older fighting game. If loyal KOF fans flock to the title, however, it might be popping for at least a little bit. I would love to get some matches in and prepare for KOF XV.

That being said, I’m really excited for some reason. Maybe it’s because SNK is picking up the steam and sharing the love for their classic games. I would love to see KOF XV become a mainstream fighting game hit like Street Fighter and Tekken. SNK has been quite busy with their games and new console lately. With that being said, here’s hoping their latest hit delivers!

We’ll keep you posted on upcoming news for KOF XV. Follow up with us on our social media links below! If you have anything to say about SNK’s upcoming releases, leave a note in the replies!

What can SNK do to ensure that The King of Fighters XV succeeds?

SNK’s Future Lies with The King of Fighters XV.

2009 began the renaissance of fighting games. With the release of Street Fighter IV, the gaming industry would see a drastic change in the approach to fighting games over the course of the next decade. That generation would see the first balance patches for fighting games, DLC, large numbers of players entering major tournaments, and even developers supporting their respective communities. Netherrealm Studios would sponsor $10,000 pot bonuses for tournaments while major figureheads and developers, like Tekken creator, Katsuhiro Harada, would attend EVO and Final Round. SNK never had the following of Street Fighter, Marvel vs. Capcom, or Tekken, at least not in a America. Certain regions of Asia and Mexico value the King of Fighters as one of the most prominent fighting games. Meanwhile, many players in the west got their taste of SNK through the heavily successful crossover title, Capcom vs. SNK 2. Featuring Terry Bogard, Rock Howard, Kyo Kusanagi, and many others, CvS2 would introduce these players to SNK franchises for the very first time. Despite this, SNK would still maintain only a niche following in America. The King of Fighters XIV released in 2016. Despite SNK trying to capitalize on the modern successes of fighting games, The King of Fighters XIV’s momentum never quite picked up in the U.S. Most prominently, the visual models were not considered appealing. From King of Fighters ’94 to King of Fighters XIII, all used animated sprites. XIV was the first to use 3D modeling. Even after SNK released a patch, the game had already made its impression on the players and would fade into obscurity. Also of note, EVO 2017 featured the game, but notably, only one American player made it into the Top 8. Compared to other games, the Top 8 of KOF XIV featured global talent with only one American player. Most recently, however, SNK released Samurai Shodown for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. The first Samurai Shodown title released in many years, it offers a unique gameplay style. Featuring slower combat, with hits that deal massive amounts of damage, it quickly gained a following. As a result, the title was featured as an event at EVO 2019. Despite the game’s poor online netcode driving many players away from online matches, it maintains a following for local tournament scenes. Furthermore, SNK will release the title on Nintendo Switch later this year. But perhaps the single most prominent element of this topic is the inclusion of Terry Bogard in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Revealed as the 4th DLC character for Nintendo’s popular fighting game franchise, Terry Bogard brought with him not only his fighting style, but Terry’s King of Fighters Stadium stage with his DLC pack, many character models from the KOF series, and music from Fatal Fury, King of Fighters, Samurai Shodown, Athena, Psycho Soldier, Ikari Warriors, Alpha Mission, and even Metal Slug. Furthermore, Smash creator, Masahiro Sakurai, elaborated heavily on the importance of SNK in fighting games and even how much their games influenced Smash with its mechanics.

Point #1: Make a Visually Appealing Title

Samurai Shodown uses an art style similar to Street Fighter IV and V. They’re going with what has proven to work in the market. Bandai Namco has stuck with beautiful character models for SoulCalibur and Tekken, while Arc Systems Works sticks to its animated sprites featured in Dragon Ball FighterZ and BlazBlue Cross Tag. Notably, Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite received heavy criticism over its character models. Among Dante, Chun-Li, and others, the game’s lack of visual appeal helped keep it away from EVO, among other reasons. Despite Marvel vs. Capcom being a longtime mainstay at the EVO championships, EVO 2018 was perhaps the first time the series missed out. Even though these character models would later be fixed, perhaps this was a case of, “too little, too late.” SNK would benefit greatly from revamping their direction on visual models and animation. While one can argue “graphics don’t make a game,” these arguments help solidify that games that garner low reception for their visuals will not reap the benefits of its competition.

Point #2: Make the Netcode the Most Efficient Possible

As mentioned earlier, Samurai Shodown features less-than-stellar netcode. It’s bad enough that you’re likely to never find a random match online despite the game being out for only a year. Whatever keeps online fighting games active for years hasn’t worked for SNK thus far. Netcode is important for the online players who want to consider getting into competitive tournaments. Without reliable online play, players will give up on the game. If they have no local, offline scene, they will simply move onto the next game to play. Keep in mind, however, that SNK has already begun using rollback netcode with thanks to Code Mystics for porting their games to modern systems.  For a long story short, it’s better than the standard netcode used in online fighting games. With that being said, Code Mystics began updating their ports of classic SNK games for Steam and PS4. Garou, KOF 97, SamSho V Special, and The Last Blade 2 all feature rollback netcode.

Point #3: Capitalize on a Nintendo Switch Release.

Consider that Samurai Shodown is coming to Nintendo Switch. Now also consider that Terry Bogard is in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. For those unaware, Super Smash Bros. serves as a fantastic marketing tool for game franchises. Perhaps the most notable example would be the inclusion of Marth and Roy in Super Smash Bros. Melee. Despite the Fire Emblem series being exclusive to Japan at the time, fans demanded Fire Emblem come to America out of curiosity for these characters. Two years later, Fire Emblem: Blazing Blade would come to America. This would begin the series’ journey to the west with nearly every installment being released overseas. Moreover, it would continue the tradition of new Fire Emblem lords getting into Smash, most notably with the release of Byleth in Smash from Fire Emblem: Three Houses. Even Sakurai himself admitted that Byleth’s inclusion for Smash was part of marketing on Nintendo’s part to promote the game. Another example of Smash marketing would be the release of Hero in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Immediately after showcasing the Hero trailer at E3 2019, Nintendo showcased a trailer for his home game, Dragon Quest XI S. This was timed purposely to garner interest among fans to try the next big game on Nintendo’s console. By marketing Hero, they market Dragon Quest. The best possible thing that SNK can do is to capitalize on Terry’s inclusion in Smash. It goes without saying that this would include a brand new fanbase of Nintendo fans, many who are new to The King of Fighters, to try the latest release in the series. As Joker’s release in Smash even garnered prominent members of the Smash community to stream Persona 5, releasing King of Fighters on Smash’s console would not even necessitate players to get another console just to try the game. Now you have Terry players and curious Smash fans trying The King of Fighters and ensuring the game becomes successful.

Final Thoughts

I played Capcom vs. SNK 2 back in the day. I was never a competitive fighter, though. I just enjoyed the characters and stories. Eventually I tried The King of Fighters 2002 Unlimited Match on Xbox 360 and really enjoyed it. I loved the music and character animations. But the release of Terry completely caught my attention in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. I ended up using this character competitively in brackets and fell in love with his moveset. But I also became enamored by all the music and SNK lore that came with his inclusion. It prompted me to download several King of Fighters titles and even some of the titles included from Code Mystics’ ports on PS4. I would definitely consider myself a newer KOF fan in that regard. But I would love to watch it succeed. I want SNK to capitalize on the foundation Nintendo has already given them through Smash. And I want the loud criticism from unsatisfied fans to help guide SNK into crafting the best fighting game possible. It’s a beautiful thing to know that they support local tournaments that host their games. But I would love to see their investment capitalize into a fresh start and introduce a new generation of fans to their stylistic character designs, battle mechanics, and fantastic music. If you would love to see The King of Fighters XV come to Nintendo Switch, let us know in the comments below. What is your favorite SNK game memory?