Momocon Officially Canceled.

Momocon 2020

Earlier today, Momocon’s officials have canceled this year’s event. The annual cosplay convention, which celebrates gaming, anime, and other nerd culture, will miss its first event since its conception in 2005. Held in Atlanta, GA, Momocon takes place every year at the Georgia World Congress Center and the Omni Hotel.

Unfortunately, due to the COVID-19 crisis, the convention will be canceled until next year. While Momocon previously announced the event would be postponed, this update outlines the full cancellation. If you signed up for the event or registered for anything, please refer to it for any refunds.

Momocon has brought forth a wide-variety of events, including panels and gaming tournaments. The convention also hosts a massive game room. Among its tournaments include various competitive titles, like fighting games, but perhaps its most prominent claim to fame is its series of Super Smash Bros. tournaments. Beginning in 2015, the Super Smash Bros. Wii U tournament, won by Fatality, would eventually bring in more players. Each year, Momocon would pay out pot bonuses for the Top 8 players. From 2016 onward, Momocon would be attended regularly by top players, such as Nairo. This year, Momocon would have hosted a $10k pot bonus.

Smash Tournaments

In particular, Momocon has a history of hosting iconic moments in the Smash community. In 2017, Nairo faced Fatality in grand finals as both players won in 2016 and 2015, respectively. Nairo would win and become double-champion. Fatality, prior to the match, also defeated ranked #1 player ZeRo in bracket.

Nairo and Fatality would face each other once more at Momocon 2018.

Momocon 2019 also became the first S-Tier tournament in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. With over 1,000 entrants, Momocon would receive the largest turnout in their own Smash history as well. The tournament would be won by MKLeo, the currently ranked #1 player, showcasing his Joker and continuing his reign of dominance.

Known as a Smash major tournament and Georgia’s largest Smash tournament, Momocon adds to a growing list of canceled tournaments. Due to its handling of multiple events, Momocon’s cancellation deals a blow to competitive gamers as well as anime fans and cosplayers looking forward to panels. Its unique focus on esports, anime, and cosplay focus brought in a record attendance of nearly 40,000 people last year. Unfortunately, as with many others, Momocon followed suit and canceled this year’s event.

Please make sure you follow procedures, stay indoors, and stay safe from possible contagions. In the meantime, continue following our news for updates on upcoming Smash tournaments, southeast cons, and updates on the Coronavirus. We’ll update you once gaming events are up and running again. We look forward to returning to conventions as much as all of you.

We’d like to hear your thoughts. If you’ve attended Momocon in the past, when did you start going? What brings you to Momocon and did you have plans to attend this year?

Rango’s Smash Column – Everyone Plays Wi-Fi Tournaments Now.

Wi-Fi Replaces Real Life Tournaments

Notice: We will be moving to a biweekly format after this edition of Rango’s Smash Column. Stay tuned for more tips and Smash news on AllCoolThings and be sure to follow our social media channels!

Hello and welcome to our weekly Smash column. This week, we’ll discuss the growing surge of online tournaments in the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate community. While the last offline tournament, CEO Dreamland, brought in over 600 competitors, it left many players wanting more. Unfortunately, due to the Coronavirus, many quarantines line the nation. As a result, these regions have all canceled their offline tournaments to avoid spreading the disease. This also includes major events, such as Momocon, which notably brought over 1,000 players to register at last year’s Super Smash Bros. Ultimate tournament.

Thus, the seeming “bane” of Smash – online play – now receives a second lease on life. Despite its notorious lag and netcode issues, competitive players still want to play Smash Bros. While online ladders and tournaments have always maintained a presence in the Smash community, only now have top competitive players garnered interest in the scene.

Nairo, noted player and streamer, has hosted the “Naifu Wars” WiFi series since Ultimate’s release. With the prevalence of online play, his latest tournament has already capped its maximum entrants. Notable commentators, such as EE and Hazmatt, will participate in the event as well.

The tournament begins on March 28th. You can check out the details here.

Local Scenes

Additionally, local tournament scenes have also begun hosting online tournaments. Some of them require players, of the tournament’s respective state, to enter. 4o4 Esports will continue hosting online tournaments in Georgia. Until the Coronavirus begins to clear up around the world, expect more online tournaments to appear over the next few weeks. In the meantime, we will keep you posted with news regarding the Coronavirus and its impact on gaming events. Stay up to date on AllCoolThings for more news every week in Rango’s Smash Column!

What does the future hold?

As it stands, there are no plans to host offline tournaments in the U.S. With the nation under quarantine, players will continue using online as a means to enter tournaments and win money. Most recently, YouTube star Alpharad hosted the Quarantine Series. This appears to be the first of a series of Smash tournaments. Note that Kola, who won Soaked Series and placed 2nd at CEO Dreamland, won this inaugural event.

Perhaps this serves as a successor to the Smash World Tour, which was put on hold due to the Coronavirus. However, please note the names in the chart. All of these players are currently on the fall PGR. With offline tournaments on hiatus, the top stars of Smash’s tournaments now use online to continue building their resume. Until the quarantine lifts for Coronavirus, expect to see more top talent rise up to online play while we see more online tournaments hosting big names and big prizes. As always, remember to check smash.gg to see the list of upcoming online tournaments which you can enter!

Do you plan on entering online tournaments? If you’re entering or watching, let us know if you see any worth checking out!

Rango’s Smash Column – 3/2/20

Smash Column

Hello and welcome to my Smash Column. This week I’ll be discussing tips that can help you improve your Smash game! Whether you’re playing online or training for a tournament, you’ll want to make sure your strategy and tactics align with your methods. Here’s a few things you can do to step your game up and put the edge over your opponent!

Force Their Approach

One thing that separates characters on the roster is their ability to approach. The key to note here is their mobility and special moves. Some characters are quick on the ground and in the air. Others might have a special move that helps them gain ground quickly. Still others might not have either. And finally, you’ll have projectile characters who play defensive. They’re trying to force your approach instead. Against a Dedede I fought online, I realized that he has no approach options. Due to his slow mobility on the ground, and in the air, I could keep distance and force his other options. Once he realized his projectiles, Gordo, were no longer working, I could keep my space and play neutral how I wanted to. Around 2:50, I decided to quit approaching for punishes and let him come to me. The best time to force your opponent’s approach is when you have a stock advantage. Because of course that’s when they have to come to you. Otherwise they risk losing via time-out.

Being at Stock Disadvantage

If you’re behind, but want to play smart, the key here isn’t to force approaching your opponent. Rather, start cornering them. Take up the ground near them where they try and bait you out. Keep a safe distance and mind their burst options, or attack range. If they can’t hit you, you’re safe. Get space between the middle of the stage and the edge, perhaps cornering them and forcing them to pull out an option. If it’s unsafe, punish it. This is one way you can begin making a comeback even if you’re struggling.

Breathe

The most important thing you can do, during a match, is to breathe. Remain in control and never feel overwhelmed by your opponent. If you feel your shoulders slinking or your eyes bulging, you may be losing control to your opponent. Remember to take deep breaths and remain focused. In through your nose, out through your mouth. Remaining calm and not getting heated means you maintain control through the end of your set.

Apply Methods to Your Strategy

Know the difference between strategies and tactics. Your strategy is “what” you’re trying to accomplish. Your tactics are “how” you’re going to do it or what method you’re choosing. In this match, I know what I want to do: desync the Ice Climbers. In doing so, I force the player to chase and rescue his Nana in order to perform his combos. However, if he cannot get Nana in time, I can KO her. Likewise, the energy he spends trying to rescue her leaves him almost defenseless. But my tactics and methods vary. For instance, if my goal is to desync the Climbers, I’ll grab one of them. If I grab Popo, Nana is too dumb to punish. If I accidentally grab Nana, Popo, controlled by the player, can smack me in retaliation. In turn, he’ll chase after Nana and gain the advantage. Anytime they’re not syncing properly, and I notice their movement is off, I can go in. Nana doesn’t know what to do when the player flubs an input. Use a dash attack or something fast just to throw them off. This will force the player to make a choice: chase after Nana or defend themselves until she returns. In this case, the strategy is desync. The tactic is to use dash attack, grab, or another fast move that generates decent knockback. Wait for your opportunity, and then strike. Charging headfirst into Blizzard or their disjointed aerials can end up costing you a stock. Make sure you breathe and stay mindful of your opportunities so you don’t feel overwhelmed.

Disadvantage State

The last thing I want to mention is being in disadvantage state. When you’re attacked by an opponent, you may fly away or you may fly upwards. If you fly away, you’re offstage and have to recover sideways. If you’re launched upwards, you’ll need to find a way to come back to the ground. Many players struggle with this for several reasons. For one, some characters have a bad disadvantage state. Remember how I said some characters have good approach options while others don’t? The same applies to the disadvantage state. If you’re trying to land, some characters have speed moves, Down Aerials that come down quickly, or even teleports. Others are heavy, slow, and get juggled easily. That’s where you learn to save your airhop, airdodge at an appropriate time, and cross-up, or land opposite of your opponent’s direction. If you’re launched offstage, you’ll have to recover to the ledge. Failure to do so means certain death. Getting edgeguarded means your opponent KO’d you offstage. Getting gimped means they used an attack that didn’t launch you, but stopped your recovery and all of your options. In both cases, it becomes vital that you do not lose your mind over it. Everyone gets knocked into disadvantage state, even top players. It’s a natural process of getting hit. What you do to capitalize and return depends largely on your mentality, sense of control, and ability to adapt. One video that helped me is from Poppt. Here’s a video explaining methods to get back to stage easier. If you like his content, be sure to subscribe to him for more helpful tips! That’s all I have for this week’s Smash column. Be sure to stay tuned and follow AllCoolThings on Twitter for more updates on Super Smash Bros. Ultimate tips! Did you learn anything from this column? What do you apply mentally when you’re struggling against an opponent? Let us know in the comments below!

Four of the Biggest Upsets in Pools at Frostbite 2020’s Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Tournament.

Frostbite 2020

As Super Smash Bros. Ultimate enters its second year, we’ve recently closed the chapter on one of its biggest tournaments: Frostbite 2020. Featuring 1,280 entrants, the supermajor (or international) tournament concluded with ranked #1 in the world, MKLeo, taking Maister 6-0 in Grand Finals. However, aside from the Top 8 superstars who made it into the finals of the event, we’ll take this time to introduce some of the names made through pools. Some of these bracket-busters made huge waves using less familiar characters against some of the best players in the game. You can view the full bracket here. #1. Salem vs. Bonren At the start of the set, Salem used Snake, the character he’s been using for most of his Ultimate career. Pitted against him was Bonren, a Texas Smash player using an infamous WiFi pariah, Zelda. Known for being a lower-tier character and driving people mad online, Bonren set out to prove this character was capable of standing against the best players offline. The result? Bonren started off this set at a disadvantage until the middle of the first game. Making a comeback, he eventually pressed Salem with a well-timed back aerial, gaining a lead with a KO at only 92%. Bonren would then close out the first game with Din’s Fire on Snake’s lackluster recovery. Perhaps one of the first matches to feature Zelda after the recent update, Bonren would stay with the Hylian Princess while Salem switched to Hero. However, without the use of Bounce to reflect Zelda’s projectile kit, Bonren would close out against Salem 2-0, once for Snake and once for Hero. This match showcased that Zelda’s Din’s Fire buff, which received buffs during the last update, really made the difference. Overall, this match showed that, despite her seemingly-unreactable specials damning her as one of the most hated online characters, Zelda was now a threat in offline brackets as well. #2. Hungrybox vs. RFang “Upset” and “Hungrybox” don’t go together in the same sentence unless someone beats Hungrybox. Despite being the best player in Melee, however, Hungrybox had a wall to climb against the recent PGR inductee and #1 in South Carolina, RFang. Additionally, he had to fight his adversary using Jigglypuff, often looked down as one of the worst characters in the game. And yet, in Game 1, RFang held a lead for the first part of the stock. Yet Hungrybox would not relent with his offense. He could not afford to keep Young Link at a distance. Yet Young Link’s small Kokiri Sword was small enough to clank, or even lose, to Jigglypuff’s long limbs. Using this to his advantage, he could not only take the lead, but even successfully edgeguard RFang several times. Even after an SD at the start of Game 2, RFang managed to bring it back and maintain an even game. However, Hungrybox got exactly what he wanted: RFang on the ledge and vulnerable to edgeguards. Young Link’s Spin Attack recovery proved to be a deficit against Jigglypuff’s strong, wide Nairs. And with every time he was offstage, Hungrybox could garner damage with aerials or take the stock. At the end of the day, Melee’s Champion defeated the Beast of the Southeast, proving that he’s ready for his journey into Ultimate territory against its best players. #3. ScAtt vs. Paseriman Ranked 3rd in Georgia and 40th on the PGRU, Mega Man and Snake main, ScAtt, went up against Paseriman, a Fox from Japan. From the beginning of Game 1, Paseriman’s Fox kept the pressure on ScAtt. The latter could barely turn it around on the final stock when he was edgeguarded by Fox’s Nair offstage. Switching to Snake Game 2, ScAtt could not keep the gap closed as well this time. Paseriman’s pressure and advantage state proved too much for the stealth veteran, leading him to 2-0 victory against Georgia’s Blue Bomber. #4. Gackt vs. Grayson Known largely as the best Ness in Japan and arguably the world, Gackt took on Grayson in pools. ROB, a character quickly gaining prominence in tournaments over the course of the last year. Game 1 ended with Gackt already at a 91% deficit before Grayson would end the match with a USmash combo. Despite Gackt’s strong zoning with PK Thunder near the beginning, Grayson would quickly assert his dominance and own counter-camping through the use of Gyro and Robo-Beams before going in with heavy rushdown. In Game 2, Gackt maintained a much healthier lead around the 2nd stock mark. Upon the last stock scenario though, Grayson once again asserted dominance at the ledge. Starting with a hefty ledgetrap, Grayson would catch Gackt heading into the other direction and deliver one last grab combo to take the set 2-0.

Personal Analysis

I’ve always believed Zelda was better than players gave credit for. She was looked at as a mid-tier throughout Ultimate’s current lifespan. However, talented players online have at least showcased an ability not found in tournaments. It took Frostbite and one Zelda main to stand forth against Salem and prove this character was viable. Moreover, the recent buffs would certainly cement that this character could stand a chance against the roster. Living in Georgia, I’m familiar with ScAtt and RFang. In Georgia, we don’t have any Fox players. Matchup practice against this character is about as dry as the Gobi Desert. ScAtt definitely played well with his Mega Man against Perseriman. Perhaps that might prove the matchup is at least even in that regard. As for Young Link, despite RFang’s loss in pools to Hungrybox, another player would take the mantle and drive the character to Top 8. Ohio’s own Toast, formerly from North Carolina, proved his dominance against a number of top level players to make it this far. Having not only bore witness to Hungrybox’s Jigglypuff on his stream, but also playing the man himself online, I could attest that I was not entirely surprised by his win over RFang.
Credit: JageRage7
Also, Grayson lives in Texas, the same state in which one of the best Ness mains in the U.S. lives: Awestin. While it’s only a theory, perhaps the matchup practice proved worthy for the ROB main at Frostbite. Overall, one thing this tournament proved is that SSBU maintains a number of sleepers, which include players and characters alike. While Frostbite was full of upsets throughout the bracket, you could take a look at 4 of the more prominent pools matches that turned heads this past weekend. Be sure to check out more of the Frostbite VODs on the official VGBootCamp channel! Did you watch Frostbite? Do you have a favorite player or match? Let us know in the comments below!