Publishers of Sense – A Cyberpunk Ghost Story Refuse to Censor Their Game.

Earlier this week, news came to Nintendo Switch owners that an M-rated visual novel title would debut on the system. The marketing of large-chested anime-inspired designs inspired outrage from viewers on social media.

Despite the title having been released on Steam, the upcoming release for Switch has also caused social media users to attack Nintendo as well for releasing the game on their system. While the Switch is no stranger to Japanese otome games, the outrage perhaps stems from people’s views of Nintendo maintaining a family-friendly image.

The summary of outrage stems from a Facebook post by Shogun Get-chan. Here, it showcases the Twitter backlash towards the publisher and developer. The last post shows the publisher responding to the backlash and refusing to kowtow to the critics.

Top Hat Studios followed up with a post summing up many of the hateful, critical messages sent to them.

Likewise, developers who have had their games published by Top Hat Studios also chimed in with their response.

About Sense – A Cyberpunk Ghost Story

Titled Sense – A Cyberpunk Ghost Story, this visual novel showcases a narrative surrounding a supernatural mystery. The player will solve puzzles while exploring in 2D, not unlike Atlus and Vanillaware’s 2020 hit, 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim.

Censorship in Recent Games

This past decade was no stranger to censorship. Sony, in particular, has been in the hot seat for their policies regarding western releases of Japanese games. Titles, such as Senran Kagura 7EVEN, would not receive a western release on PS4. Moreover, Dead or Alive Xtreme 3 did not receive an overseas release despite the previous two titles being localized. Additionally, Dead or Alive Xtreme 3: Scarlet was also censored even in Asian countries. Furthermore, Mortal Kombat developers were accused of kowtowing to the censorship crowd due to designing the female characters to dress more conservatively than in their past incarnations.

You can also date some of the censorship issues back to the mid-2010s with the release of certain titles for Nintendo systems. The 3DS featured Fire Emblem Fates and a heavily localized script that deviated from the original release. Furthermore, Fatal Frame: The Maiden of Black Water on Wii U lost several costumes in the localized release.

What This Means

The shift in politics goes hand-in-hand with the growing culture of social media. Game developers do their best to cater to fans and avoid getting canceled and being labeled as bigots. However, Japanese game and anime developers continuously show that they will do their own thing whether or not western consumers complain about their moves.

Likewise, people promoting censorship and politically correct culture have called out developers. People like Katsuhiro Harada, the developer of Tekken, have expressed their own views on western politics. People seeking clout on Twitter have, as such, chosen to start their own campaign.

However, just as the culture mounted into attacking game publishers and developers for their right to express their art in their works, perhaps Top Hat Studios’ stance will take one step against the overly-sensitive political culture within the gaming industry. The outrage has, in turn, drawn the attention of potential fans who may have never heard of Sense otherwise.

Sense: A Cyberpunk Ghost Story is currently available for PC. It will release for Nintendo Switch on January 7th, 2021. You can download the title from the Nintendo eShop. Keep up with us as we keep you up on AllCoolThings’ latest and greatest gaming content. Be sure to follow our links on social media below!

History Lesson: Persona 3, Persona 4, and Atlus’ Localization Changes

With the recent releases of Catherine: Full Body, and Persona 5 Royal, developer Atlus fell under scrutiny due to notable censorship of these two fabled titles. In the case of Catherine, a bit of controversy emerged from dead-naming a trans-female character. In Persona 5 Royal’s case, Atlus chose to change a scene where Ryuji got hit on by homosexual men. This created outrage from various sides of the fanbase to include responding by boycotting the game.

While many fans of Atlus’ games got their start to the series with Persona 5, their past titles showcased scenes that might be deemed “not kosher” in today’s political climate. While Catherine was originally released in 2011, and Persona 5 came out in 2017, Atlus deemed it necessary to edit the re-releases’ scenes to acclimate the changing internet culture. One example of these past titles includes 2007’s Persona 3. I’ll outline a few scenes that, while some viewers may find innocuous or humorous, might also raise a few eyebrows.

Persona 3

During a trip to the beach, three of the male characters decide to go on a “babe hunt.” This means they will flirt with women on the beach in hopes of getting a date. While their first two attempts end up getting blown up in their faces, the third option starts off successfully.

The scene begins at 5:06 when Akihiko and Junpei make their pass at a woman. All is going well until Akihiko points out what is implied to be a stray beard hair. This outs the character as trans. However, while the identification itself isn’t so much noteworthy, she also comments how close she was to snagging a “boy-toy.” This implies the character to be promiscuous and predatory, seeking to date someone and trap them.

Persona 4

In the month of June, three male characters once again go on a “babe hunt,” this time in the city of Okina. While their efforts end with their rejection, one character seems to get catfished with the number he got. The number he calls belongs to a classmate, Hanako Ohtani, who is morbidly obese and unattractive.

At 14:00, you’ll meet the girl who follows the stereotypes of “selfish, ugly, fat girl.” She suddenly invites herself to Yosuke’s bike and breaks it by jumping on it.

Days later, you meet her again on a camping trip. She’s unwilling to share her massive portion of food and snores loudly at night. At 7:14, Yosuke asks her for food, only to be turned away. At 14:21, the snoring ensues.

Also note that the Persona wiki deems that there is another overweight character in an earlier game, Persona 2, who’s said to be treated more sensitively. However, if you look through the gallery, you’ll notice that she ends up losing weight at some point in the game, perhaps used as a sort of redeeming quality to her appearance. Once again, many players deem this scene normal and humorous. Others, however, might consider this fat-shaming.

How has censorship changed the landscape for gaming?

Moving slightly off the Atlus subject for a minute, keep in mind how much the political climate has changed in just the past 5 years. Nintendo censored Fire Emblem Fates, Fatal Frame, Xenoblade Chronicles X, and the recent Tokyo Mirage Sessions release on Switch. They even censored Bernadetta’s Support conversation in Fire Emblem: Three Houses in a recent patch as well as replaced a voice actor due to his history of abuse. Another smaller example would be Super Smash Bros. Ultimate’s censorship of Mithra, from Xenoblade Chronicles 2. However, Smash Bros. creator, Masahiro Sakurai, explained in the past that he had to censor female characters or else the game’s CERO rating would raise.

Sony has also taken measures, in their recent policies, to censor or not release games in the west. Among these include longtime favorite series from Japan, such as Senran Kagura and Dead or Alive.

How this affects Atlus’ games.

Persona 3 and Persona 4 were released before the days of digital patches and updates. The aforementioned scenes fell in with cultural humor considered normal for its release. While the scenes were likely created with humor and no harm intended, reflect on censored games in the past few years. They might not pass the litmus test to be released without various amounts of editing to be re-released in the west today.

In my personal case, I played Persona 5 before going back to 3 and 4. Knowing of the censorship of Persona 5 and watching the aforementioned scene, it immediately crossed my mind. “They probably wouldn’t be allowed to get away with this today,” I thought as I watched the scenes. Granted, I could be entirely wrong, but I could also see why groups on social media could create an issue out of it.

However, please consider that Atlus has done a tremendous job of gracefully touching social issues. They tackle one character’s insecure homosexuality in Persona 4 and allow his newfound friends to accept him for who he is. Persona 5 deftly tackled issues of bullying, sexual assault, exploitation, plagiarism, suicide, blackmail, sex work, and trauma. The story revolves around punishing abusive adults, and removing them from power, while exposing their crimes for the world to see.

Some parts of the internet argue Atlus is insensitive with handling certain characters. Others praise the series for its deft handling of social issues. However, perhaps the most important thing to consider is the gray area. It becomes paramount to educate other players on the importance of accepting other people, for who they are. This falls in regardless of whether a publisher will cater to the whims of one side or the other. A black and white difference encourages fighting among fanbases whereas a gray area brings players together for a common cause: respect for other viewpoints.

Final Thoughts

Given the recent examples, scenes that involve alleged transphobia, fat-shaming, deadnaming, and homophobia are indeed hot-button issues. It’s easy for a few articles to argue one side, attack the other, and create social media fighting while doing so. However, this article does not serve to cater to any side, but to serve as a history lesson on Atlus’ titles and how recent localization policies affect social media as well as game re-releases. If you’re a fan of Persona 5, or Catherine, and did not know about these scenes in Persona 3 and Persona 4, then hopefully this enlightened you with a bit of trivia.

Also, on last personal note, Persona 3 FES and Persona 4 Golden are wonderful JRPGs that I strongly recommend getting. If you enjoyed Persona 5, please give them a try one day!

Do you feel these issues are worth addressing for game releases or do you feel they’re blown out of proportion? Let us know in the comments below!