Ghosts ‘n Goblins Resurrection: New to the Series? Here’s a Quick Primer to Get You Started!

Capcom is set to release their upcoming platformer, Ghosts ‘n Goblins Resurrection, for the Nintendo Switch next month. First debuting at The Game Awards 2020, the upcoming title marks the first entry in over a decade. Known for its brutal and punishing difficulty, the Ghosts ‘n Goblins series continues to charm players with its soundtracks and monster designs.

This series features you playing as Sir Arthur, a knight who must rescue the Princess from the demons of hell. These hordes of monsters take many forms with some surprisingly twisted and terrifying for such a bright and colorful game. The end of each game features a showdown against the demon lord which usually comes from Biblical and mythical origins, such as Samael and Astaroth.

Much like Konami’s Castlevania, the series features a gothic horror approach albeit a bit more colorful and less bloody. Arthur can also equip different weapons which include throwing daggers and even firebombs which act like the series’ own Holy Water. 2D side-scrolling aficionados will immediately feel at home playing this title.

Did You Say Hard?

Yes, I did say this game is hard. It’s a daunting and unforgiving series dating back to the original Ghosts ‘n Goblins release in the mid-80s. Arthur can only take two hits before he’s reduced to a pile of bones.

Fear not because later titles, like Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts for SNES, offered easier difficulty levels and extra lives. For the unsuspecting player, though, Normal will rip them to shreds on just the first stage. Though, coming from Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts, I can safely tell you that it is the hardest stage in the game before the final. The rest are moderately difficult but not spawn-zombies-in-your-face difficult. You can learn more about the difficulty settings and new modes here.

I’m not going to say something outlandish like “Ghosts ‘n Goblins is the Dark Souls of 2D platformers” even though that wouldn’t be far from the contextual truth. The series is, in fact, soul-crushing at times. Fortunately, Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts for SNES is quite fair in that it punishes your mistakes but rewards good play. It comes down to more than just stage memorization. Your reflexes, proper item choosing, and your ability to time your jumps carefully will reward your play in time.

Can I just say that I adore Shinkiro‘s art?

Curious About Trying the Series Before Ghosts ‘n Goblins Resurrection?

If you own a Switch and have an online subscription, you have access to the NES and SNES libraries. As such, you can try Ghosts ‘n Goblins for NES and Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts for SNES. Unless Switch ever adds a Sega Genesis library ala the Virtual Console from past Nintendo consoles, you might have to emulate to get Ghouls ‘n Ghosts.

Sony’s PlayStation Portable also featured Ultimate Ghosts ‘n Goblins which released in 2006. This was the first rebirth of the series before its long slumber. This title also added easier difficulties.

With that being said, I only recommend Ghosts ‘n Goblins on NES if you’re a complete masochist. You do not have a double jump and movement is much stiffer. If you want to play a quality platformer, then I strongly recommend Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts on SNES. It’s an enjoyable game with some great music and a reasonably difficult challenge for platforming enthusiasts. Don’t feel bad if you’re new to the series and want to try an easy difficulty either.

Brief Timeline of the Series

If you’re interested in the release order, take a look here!

Ghosts ‘n Goblins came out in the Arcades in 1985 and NES in 1986. Known for its tremendously difficult platforming action, the series would kickoff with Arthur rescuing the Princess from the clutches of the demon Astaroth.

Ghouls ‘n Ghosts debuted on Arcade machines in 1988. The sequel to Ghosts ‘n Goblins actually featured a backstory of a demonic genocide to include the life of the Princess. While ported on multiple systems, Ghouls ‘n Ghosts is perhaps best known for appearing on the Sega Genesis.

Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts came out on SNES in 1991. This key title featured quality-of-life improvements to control, giving Arthur a double jump, and began to round out the difficulty. The title received a Game Boy Advance port in 2002 as well featuring new level designs.

Ultimate Ghosts ‘n Goblins is the first reboot of the series. Not affiliated as a direct sequel to any game, Ultimate Ghosts ‘n Goblins brought the series to PSP in 2006. This version brought new difficulty modes which affected level designs. Plus it featured a new equipping system allowing Arthur to store his weapons. The title received a Japanese-exclusive re-release as well.

Capcom releaesed the ever rare Makaimura for Wonderswan in the 90s as well as two mobile apps, titled Gold Knights, for mobile devices. The series also spun-off into titles such as Gargolye’s Quest. This culminated into the popular SNES title, Demon’s Crest. Additionally, Capcom also developed the Maximo titles for PS2, a sister series which took the formula into 3D.

Final Thoughts

I’m eager to try Ghosts ‘n Goblins Resurrection. I feel Switch has been hurting for games over the past year and Capcom’s helping inject some life (and death) into the library. Plus nothing feels quite as good as seeing an old franchise revived once more. We haven’t seen Arthur since his inclusion in Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite.

But Infinite is ugly so we’ll show you Marvel vs. Capcom 3 instead.

Capcom will also release Capcom Arcade Stadium for Nintendo Switch in February. This title will feature 32 Capcom classics including Ghosts ‘n Goblins and Super Street Fighter II Turbo. You can also choose to buy them in bundles instead of the whole game at once.

ACT Capcom Arcade Stadium

Ghosts ‘n Goblins Resurrection will come out for Nintendo Switch on February 25, 2021. Within a month away, you may want to check out Super Ghouls ‘n Ghosts and see what the fuss is about. Be sure to follow our social media channels below for our latest gaming content!

Until next time!

Resident Evil Village Preview: New Details on Trailer, Demo, and Alluring Antagonists.

Earlier this month, Capcom unveiled their Resident Evil Showcase. This presentation featured several new ways to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Resident Evil survival horror series. But moreover, they showcased a new trailer for Resident Evil Village as well as a PS5-exclusive demo. Prior to the game’s release, Capcom will release a new demo for all platforms featuring the title.

One of the biggest eyecatchers involves the new villains featured in the demo. Among them include Lady Alcina Dimitrescu, an 8 ft. tall voluptuous woman with a vampire complex. Aiding her are three girls, dressed in black, which are presumed to be her daughters. Needless to say, the internet quickly became smitten with her.

“Welcome to the family, son.”

What we know about the trailer features a castle similarly to Resident Evil 4. Moreover, much of the setup features a sort of gothic atmosphere as the women chasing you around seek your blood. As such, you will find pools of blood within the catacombs.

What to Expect from Resident Evil Village.

Resident Evil Village is romanized as “VIII,” indicating this is also Resident Evil 8. As such, it is the direct sequel to Resident Evil 7. Featuring RE7’s protagonist, Ethan Winters, his wife Mia Winters goes missing once more. He must also rescue their newborn daughter, Rosemary, from their kidnappers.

The first-person view returns from Resident Evil 7. It will also feature an inventory setup akin to Resident Evil 4. Additionally, a merchant will appear to sell you wares.

Capcom released a PlayStation 5-exclusive demo called Maiden. This roughly 20-minute demo features you playing as an unknown protagonist attempting to escape the jail beneath the castle. It will introduce you to the basic mechanics of the game.

Additionally, Capcom revealed a new multiplayer title. Tiled RE: Verse, this will feature major characters from across the series duking it out in free-for-all gunfire. While Capcom received lukewarm reception for releasing Resistance alongside the Resident Evil 3 remake, this title will also be released alongside Village.

Final Thoughts

I can’t say I’m not excited for Resident Evil Village. I adored Resident Evil 7 and found it to be one of the best games I ever played. I strongly recommend it to everyone reading this article right now. I hope Capcom will polish Resident Evil Village just as finely as they did with 7.

I honestly cannot take my eyes off the new antagonists either. Resident Evil scarcely features an antagonist as attractive as Lady Dimistrescu. She’s easily my favorite new female villain design in the series.

Resident Evil Village comes out on May 7, 2021. It will release for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One, Xbox Series X, and PC. Be sure to keep up with us and follow our social media links to get the latest coverage on the title!

Until next time!

We’ve Gone Four Years Without A New Ace Attorney Game.

Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney is a visual novel and puzzle series developed by Capcom. The Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney series, originally released in the early 2000s as Gyakuten Saiban in Japan, involves defending your client, in court, while solving puzzles. You’ll interact with characters and investigate murder scenes between trial dates. When you’re in court, you’ll press your witness’ testimony for more information and present evidence when you find a contradiction.

Why do people love Ace Attorney?

The Ace Attorney series features a strong narrative with many plot twists and likable characters. You’ll often run into tragic situations and experience the full weight of their consequences. On the flip side, the hilarious dialogue and character designs fit something that might feel reminiscent of the manga and anime series, Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure. The lengthy explanations, the immediate turnabouts, the explosive character animations, and even the voiced attacks feel reminiscent of a shonen manga or anime. However, it all takes place either within a courtroom or at a crime scene.

These titles carry anywhere between 12 and 20 hours of intricate narrative, solving puzzles, noteworthy soundtracks, and memorable characters. Whether the player prefers faster paced action games and likes to slow it down a little, or is a fan of slower-paced games and other visual novels, the Ace Attorney series feels right at home for people who enjoy its vibrant, anime aesthetic, writing, and puzzles. Six mainline titles later and the series continues to attract new fans thanks to Capcom’s bevy of re-releases.

Four years later…

Despite the growing success of the Ace Attorney series, though, the 6th release of the series, Spirit of Justice, came out in 2016. While the Ace Attorney series has featured spin-offs, some of them never came outside of Japan’s borders, there was a six-year gap between the 4th and 5th games of the series. However, please keep in mind that the aforementioned link lists the Game Boy Advance release dates, for the initial Japanese release, and not their western DS releases. Minus the Japanese-exclusive spin-offs, this is the longest the west has gone without an Ace Attorney title.

This could be for various reasons. The Ace Attorney series has always had a shaky foundation in the west. Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney and its sequel, Justice for All, sold to a niche crowd. Not only was it an unfamiliar genre at the time. Capcom even challenged fans to convince western fans to release the third game, Trials and Tribulations. Meanwhile, localization issues caused Gyakuten Kenji 2, the sequel to Ace Attorney Investigations, to remain exclusively in Japan.

Despite this wait, however, Capcom has already announced they will soon showcase game releases leading up to, and through, 2021. If you’re new to the Ace Attorney series, we suggest trying the Ace Attorney Trilogy for modern consoles as well as mobile phones. In the meantime, stay tuned to AllCoolThings for more info on Ace Attorney and follow our social media channels located at the bottom of the page.

Which Ace Attorney game was your favorite? Let us know in the comments below!

How Are Video Game Companies Preserving Their Titles for Future Generations?

Over the last decade, we’ve seen publishers release a tremendous amount of remakes and remasters. Some have given us incentive to play an even better version of a beloved favorite. Others, ever so rarely, have left players with a bad aftertaste.

However, one can’t deny the importance of re-releasing classics. Not only have publishers given longtime fans a chance to replay a favorite. But they’ve also introduced their legacy to a new generation of fans. With that said, I want to list a few noteworthy game companies that have put some effort into preserving their video game library for generations to come.

Capcom

Known for their many re-releases of Street Fighter II throughout history, Capcom has remastered many of their titles over the years. They’ve maintained Mega Man, Street Fighter, and several more as household names thanks to their countless re-releases. Mega Man Legacy Collection, Mega Man X Legacy Collection, and Mega Man Zero + ZX Legacy Collection feature a massive chunk of their classic platforming series. Capcom even released the Beat ’em up bundle which features some titles never seen on consoles before.

Notably, you can find the entire Resident Evil series on PS4, Xbox One, and PC. Plus, this generation saw the re-release of Okami HD, onto modern platforms, as well as Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen remastered for modern consoles. Capcom also released Devil May Cry 1-3 on Switch with DMC3 receiving some hearty new additions.

Perhaps even more noteworthy would be to consider Capcom’s remakes of Resident Evil 2 and 3. Much like Resident Evil 1’s remake, 2 and 3 were completely built from the ground up. These new features incorporate modern-day enhancements, controls, and storytelling fitting for a game of the current era.

Absences

Despite releasing Darkstalkers, Ghosts ‘n Goblins, Breath of Fire, and Power Stone for PSP, however, we have not seen these games in over a decade. Capcom did release several of their Marvel vs. and Darkstalkers titles during the last generation, but have not been seen since. Furthermore, we have not seen the likes of Viewtiful Joe since the 2000s. Capcom keeps some of these series alive, so to speak, as costumes in Street Fighter V. But we would love to play them as full games again.

However, given that Capcom does continue to release some of their best games every generation, new players will get to try Resident Evil , Okami, and many other classics. Perhaps we may yet see more long-missing names appear in this decade.

Square-Enix

The company’s habit of re-releasing titles dates back to the early 2000s. You could find Final Fantasy IV, V, and VI, on Game Boy Advance, all remade with extra content. Chrono Trigger, the 1995 SNES classic, also came out for DS in 2008. All of the aforementioned games would later come to mobile devices and Steam Despite coming out to various levels of reception, Square-Enix would continue to update and polish them for a new generation to enjoy.

Despite their noble intentions, the sprites could use some work.

One of the biggest walls Square-Enix smashed was when they announced the remaster of Final Fantasy VIII, in 2019, for modern systems. The new version of the game includes redone character textures, upscales the title to HD, and features other minor improvements. This came with a slew of other announcements featuring remastered games.

Among those included in the announcements, Square-Enix released The Mana Collection, which features the original 90s Mana trilogy. This includes Trials of Mana, previously known as Seiken Densetsu 3, which was never released in the west. Similarly, Square-Enix released Star Ocean: First Departure R, Romancing SaGa 3, and SaGa Scarlet Grace Ambitions on modern consoles. With that being said, expect to see the newly-announced remaster of Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles, as well as NieR: Replicant, within the next year.

Speaking of remakes…

Super Mario RPG

Despite the love Square-Enix has shown for many of their series, one particular game stands out missing in action. Due to the copyrights involved, Square-Enix owns the rights to many of the characters in the 1996 SNES classic, Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars. Mario’s breakout RPG remains heralded as one of the greatest JRPGs of all time.

While it was released on the Wii and Wii U Virtual Consoles, you would never see more than a passing mention from Nintendo’s social media accounts. However, it released on the SNES Classic along with Final Fantasy VI. Despite this, though, unlike many of the aforementioned titles, Super Mario RPG has never been re-released as more than a direct port without any updates.

Many fans want a remake or a true remake or sequel to Super Mario RPG. While Square-Enix has done well for preserving their most famous series, fans would love to see Nintendo and Square-Enix collaborate on another classic featuring its sorely missed characters.

Bandai Namco

Perhaps the single most impressive re-release Bandai Namco has published is Tales of Vesperia: Definitive Edition. Once lost to history as the Japan-exclusive release, the Definitive Edition includes all of the story content, new characters, and battle improvements never seen in the west. Save for Troy Baker, voice of Yuri, it also includes the original voice actors reprising their roles for the newly dubbed lines.

Meanwhile, Bandai Namco has stayed busy reviving SoulCalibur in 2018 as well as maintaining Tekken 7. These include songs from their past respective entries which you can add to any stage. If you love SoulCalibur music, you won’t be disappointed.

Also, if you’re a fan of Pac-Man, you can download it on mobile apps and play newly released maps. Namco Museum Arcade Pac for Nintendo Switch also includes a number of their old arcade hits, like Galaga and Splatterhouse.

Perhaps one day, though, Bandai Namco might release more Tales games in the west. While we’ve never gotten Tales of Destiny: Director’s Cut, Tales of Destiny II, or Tales of Rebirth, hope never truly fades.

Sega

With each generation, Sega releases new Genesis collections. You may have seen them released as Sega Genesis Collection, Sonic’s Ultimate Genesis Collection, or even Sega Genesis Classics. Let’s also not forget the release of the Sega Genesis Mini microconsole.

I’m a little sad knowing that the Sega Genesis Mini in America does not have Yu Yu Hakusho: Makyo Toitsusen.

Even though, for some reason, re-releases of Sonic 3 & Knuckles are apparently rare, Sega generally does a good job of keeping their Genesis games afloat. Sega even released a Dreamcast Collection, featuring several hits, on Steam, as well as the Saturn classic NiGHTS into Dreams…

As of late, it seems Sega has become more interested in releasing some of their classic series. Super Monkey Ball: Banana Blitz HD recently came to modern consoles. Following that, Sega released the Panzer Dragoon Remake on Nintendo Switch. Also noteworthy includes not only the remaster of Shenmue I & II on modern consoles, but the release of Shenmue III, which released over 15 years after Shenmue II.

But one more thing I want to cover is how Sega has distributed their classic series to different studios to develop their games. They collaborated with Christian Whitehead and his team to develop Sonic Mania, one of the best reviewed Sonic titles of all time. Now, with April 30th around the corner, Dotemu is set to release Streets of Rage 4, the first official title in the illustrious beat ’em up series in over 25 years.

While we would certainly love to see the return of Skies of Arcadia and Billy Hatcher, Sega has done a surprisingly stellar job of releasing classic titles and new entries onto modern-day consoles and PC. Since they own the rights to Puyo Puyo and its characters, I would also love to see the Madou Monogatari series return.

With that said, I’m even more surprised that I didn’t have to name many absent franchises this time. Sega has done a surprisingly stellar job of releasing most of their classic entries into the current era. Well done!

Nintendo

Over the last decade, Nintendo has built up a bit of a resume remaking classics we grew up with. One example includes Fire Emblem Gaiden, for Famicom in Japan, which never came to America until it was released as Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia for 3DS. Nintendo has also released four Legend of Zelda remakes, three of which were developed by GREZZO. The latest remake includes Link’s Awakening for Nintendo Switch. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD was developed by Nintendo EAD, which built the GameCube classic from the ground up and added several upgrades.

Furthermore, Nintendo has released many of their unsuccessful Wii U titles – largely due to the failure of the console itself – onto the Nintendo Switch. You’ll find some amazing software like Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze, Captain Toad: Treasure Trackers, Bayonetta 2, and Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, released with a visual update and some noteworthy updates.

However, I feel Nintendo still needs help when it comes to keeping some of their franchises alive. It goes without saying that we’ve seen more than a decade without the release of F-Zero or Golden Sun. The Nintendo Switch Online’s SNES Classics library misses a number of heavy-hitters such as Super Mario RPG and Donkey Kong Country. The lack of regular updates does not help its relevance who wish to see more titles. Even compared to the Wii Virtual Console from 14 years ago, Nintendo could do much better with the Switch online.

Puyo Puyo 2 imported on the SNES Classics libary? Now that’s a surprise.

In the past, Nintendo released the Ambassador Program for 3DS. Featuring ports of GBA titles digitally released for 3DS, this feature was only available for people who owned the initial release of the 3DS. They were not seen again until they were released on the Wii U eShop For 3DS owners who enjoy playing these games on a handheld, this did not help them at all. Also, as many players are aware, Nintendo still refuses to release Mother 3 in the west.

For Nintendo, it’s a mixed bag. They remake classic titles and the upgrades make them even better. The Switch releases of Wii U titles give players hope we could see more classics like Super Mario 3D World embraced by fans who didn’t own a Wii U. But Nintendo also seems finicky, even compared to the aforementioned companies, when it comes to keeping their abandoned series fresh.

Konami

Until recently, Konami seemed to completely neglect digital preservation. In fact, they seem to have completely ignored the console and PC gaming market entirely. After the unceremonious departure of Metal Gear creator, Hideo Kojima, and Castlevania Producer, Koji Igarashi, their studio had become bereft of classic titles.

During the 2000s, the company released amazing titles like Silent Hill 2, Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow, Metal Gear Solid 3, and Contra 4. The 2010s, on the other hand, saw the controversial reboot of Castlevania (Lords of Shadow) and what many deemed to be an unfinished title, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Even P.T. Silent Hills, a horror demo many players looked forward to, was scrapped completely.

The last few years, though, saw the release of Super Bomberman R, a return to form for the classic Bomberman series. Konami later updated the title with several free DLC releases as well as ports to the PS4, Xbox One, PC. In 2018, they also released Castlevania Requiem, which featured Castlevania: Rondo of Blood and Symphony of the Night (PSP version) for PS4.

But perhaps last year showed the biggest change in tide. Castlevania Anniversary Collection, Contra Anniversary Collection, and Konami Arcade Classics Anniversary Collection included many releases from the 80s and 90s. These titles even featured Japanese versions of their respective games as well as exclusive interviews. Even more impressive was that these were the first official releases of Castlevania Bloodlines and Contra Hard Corps, both initially released for Sega Genesis, in over 25 years.

We don’t know if this means Konami is throwing a bone to their fans or if they’re pushing back into the right direction. We can only hope to see them return to form as the gaming giant they once were.

Final Thoughts

While it’s important for game companies to keep pressing forward, by creating sequels and new IPs, it’s also important for fans to know where they came from. Releasing older games creates praise from players who want to try a new experience or relive their past memories. Furthermore, it establishes a relationship between the developers and the fans by listening to their requests.

As long as video game companies set a precedent, it might encourage other publishers to follow. Let’s hope that we can see the best of old and new from this decade onward. Maybe one day Sony might even release a remake of the PS1 JRPG classic, The Legend of Dragoon. Just maybe.

Which games do you wish to see return one day? Let us know in the comments below!

5 Essential Resident Evil Titles You Must Play

With the recent release of Resident Evil 3, Capcom has surged the series back into full mainstream. Following Resident Evil 7’s revival of the series and Resident Evil 2’s heavily successful remake, we want to promote the five best Resident Evil titles. Whether you’re a newcomer to the series or have played one or two games, this list will help you find the best games to play in the series. And the good news is that all of them are currently available for modern consoles and PC.

#5 Resident Evil 3

Starting with the most recent release, Resident Evil 3 successfully breathes new life into the 1999 classic. Featuring Jill Valentine, you’ll escape from Raccoon City while being pursued by a powerful B.O.W.: Nemesis. This variation of the Tyrant comes armed with heavy weaponry, moves faster than Jill, and will confront you throughout the game.

Utilizing the RE Engine from RE2 and RE7, this title features gorgeous animations using the over-the-shoulder perspective and the survival horror experience. Despite being only 12 hours long, with only one scenario campaign, Resident Evil 3 packs a punch from start to finish. Every element feels incredibly well-polished.

Original vs. Remake

To be honest, though, I struggle to pick a version of the game to recommend here. I have a soft-spot for the 1999 release. I loved the Live Selection and I preferred the structure of Nemesis’ pop-up encounters over him becoming a chase segment in the remake. For impact, I found it to be the best of the original PlayStation trilogy due to adding elements like ammo crafting, dodge step, and 180 turn.

On the flip-side, however, Carlos and several other characters got some amazing redesigns. The gorgeous visuals, sound, and animation really make the remake pop-out and breathe new life into it. If you loved the Resident Evil 2 remake, I can recommend it. If you’re not willing to spend full price on a shorter adventure, though, wait for a price drop.

However, keep in mind that major parts of the story were altered, as well as the level designs. Unlike Resident Evil 2’s remake, this feels like a total re-imagining in every conceivable way. With that said, I recommend the remake for newer players. But if you’re curious and want to see how Resident Evil 3 started, I cannot recommend the original enough. You can pick it up for $5.99 on the PSN Store for PS3 or Vita. It doesn’t have the gorgeous resolution of the Dreamcast or GameCube releases, but it’s the original version of the core game and definitively worth the price and then some.

#4 Resident Evil Remake

When series director, Shinji Mikami, stated that the 1997 Resident Evil hasn’t aged well, he set out to remake the title. Rebuilt from the ground up, Resident Evil (dubbed REmake) featured a new mansion layout, dialogue, voice acting, and boss battles. While it was largely the same game, it became a massive improvement over the original in every conceivable way. The gorgeous visuals stood out well enough to still be considered among the best on the GameCube even today. This definitive classic set the precedent for survival horror and what a proper remake should be built like.

In the past decade, REmake was released for HD consoles as well. Scaling up the resolution made a pretty game even prettier. On PS4, the title also runs at 60 FPS. And on the HD version, you gain access to new costumes as well as the ability to move much easier. You can choose to keep the infamous tank controls, but you also gain the option to run freely for smoother control.

Perhaps the best way to play this game is to purchase Resident Evil Origins Collection. You’ll pick up REmake as well as Resident Evil Zero in one fell swoop. But you can also purchase REmake standalone digitally. It’s all up to you if you want the main game or to take a dive on the series prequel as well. In addition to PS4, Xbox One, and PC, Resident Evil: Origins Collection is also available for Nintendo Switch.

#3 Resident Evil 7

Go tell Aunt Rhody.”

The chilling song in the opening tells the story. It tells the story of a man trying to rescue the wife he thought dead. As he enters the Baker Household, he finds grisly sights, dead bodies, and his wife, now turned by some kind of mind control.

Resident Evil 7 tells the story of the revival of survival horror. Bringing back tight corridors, monsters around the corner, and limited ammo, your attempt to escape this madhouse brings horror to a new level. Not only are you fighting zombies and members of the household, but you’ll come across grisly sights that will test your nerves. In a way, it’s RE’s foray into psychological horror as well, disturbing the player with gory sights wherever you turn.

I would argue Resident Evil 7 has the best narrative in the series. Even though it originally seems disconnected from the rest of the series, you’ll eventually read documents that help tie in with the rest of the series. Some lore alludes to the Raccoon City incident. Meanwhile, you’ll also discover involvement with Chris Redfield, who even has his own DLC campaign. It will also delve further into the mind of a psychopath featured in the main story.

Resident Evil 7 offers multiple modes and mini-games as well as two DLC campaigns. If you buy the Gold Edition, these come with the game for free. They’re several hours long each and worth the purchase to bring the story full circle.

As a whole, Resident Evil 7 revitalized the genre in the best way possible. Resident Evil 7 isn’t just a numbered title in the series, but a revolution. If you want the true meaning of horror, disgust, intrigue, and tragedy, I cannot recommend this one enough. Finally, be sure to check out some of the accolades befitting this title.

#2. Resident Evil 2 Remake

Using the aforementioned RE Engine, Resident Evil 2 successfully delivered a remake of the classic 1998 title. Featuring the over-the-shoulder camera from past Resident Evil titles, the engine allowed for fantastic animations, controls, and lighting. Dimly lit rooms of the RPD obscured enemies with all but a flashlight. Despite facing even tougher enemies than before, the ability to aim, craft ammo, and save without ribbons gave players much more control and freedom in the survival horror world. Note that if you played on Hard Mode, you would need to procure ink ribbons to save. In doing so, it offered a challenge for everyone.

Featuring two campaigns to get the true ending, the game would take roughly 20 hours to finish, if not a little more. Even after you clear the game, you could play some of the extra modes. These served as sort of escape missions where you fight off hordes of zombies to make it to your goal. They offered a score attack element almost akin to The Mercenaries from past titles. If you died, you would do a little better next time.

Resident Evil 2 excelled past expectations and brought forth a new definitive chapter in survival horror experience. It would later go on to be nominated for 2019 Game of the Year at The Game Awards and win the GotY award for the Golden Joysticks.

#1. Resident Evil 4

It goes without saying Resident Evil 4 tops this list. This revolutionary title introduced a camera angle that not only standardized modern Resident Evil, but many other popular games as well. Titles like God of War 4, Marvel’s Spider-Man, and Horizon: Zero Dawn all use this angle as well. While loyal fans saw the direction of survival horror drift towards fighting off hordes of undead, the gameplay offered perhaps the single most polished experience in the series.

While fighting off impressive enemies and using various close-combat mechanics, Leon was given many ways to defend himself. Along with vaulting over rails and hopping out of windows, this gave the player tons of freedom over control. In doing so, it optimized the gameplay and set a new series standard. Even after you beat the game, you could play a New Game+ and carry over your goods and unlocked costumes. Those seeking a challenge could also try their hand at Professional difficulty.

Even after you beat the game, you could play through The Mercenaries mode. You could play as 5 characters in 4 different maps. This score attack mode pre-loaded you with an inventory, arming you to take down as many B.O.W.s as you could while extending the time. 5-star rewards would unlock weapons.

All-in-all, Resident Evil 4 is the defining gameplay experience with some memorable dialogue and narrative. The extras it offers remains unparalleled to this day. Plus, every release after the original GameCube version featured Assignment Ada – an extra story mode – as well as new costumes. Resident Evil 4 is currently available on all modern consoles, in full HD, including on Nintendo Switch. If you’re looking for one of the single greatest games of all time, I cannot recommend this one enough.

Final Thoughts

Resident Evil’s best games range from quality survival horror to groundbreaking titles that were heralded among the best of all time. They all feature impressive enemies, boss battles, exploration, and music. If you want to try the series, these are the best ones to start with. Depending on your experience, you may want to start with Origins Collection to play the story in order. Otherwise, you can jump into RE4 to play the best game, 7 for the new start, or 2 and 3 if you want to try the latest remakes. It really doesn’t matter because which one you start with. Each title sets itself apart well from the others, offering their own experience. Go with the one your heart tells you to because you’re in for a treat if you enjoy survival horror.

Do you have a favorite? Which one appeals to you the most? Let us know in the comments below.